In between the waiting game of query writing, agent seeking, and publisher hunting, I’ve started my sequel to The Wondrous Wandering Acrobats Show called, you guessed it, The Wondrous Wandering Acrobats Show Returns. But this time they return with The Strangely UniqueThe Strangely Unique will contain many of the circus poster images of what I wanted to share in the first book but felt it couldn’t, due to the content.  The first book I played safe and I didn’t want anyone to have an excuse not to buy it.  Due to elephants and tourism in Thailand, I edited out a man riding an elephant, and instead, would allow animal characters to be portrayed in the book, as long as they didn’t seemed forced in the illustration.  I edited out a clown riding a pig and tugging on the ear. I cleaned up a whole bunch of images and even restored one.  Needless to say,  I spent a great ordeal editing the circus posters to appease every walk of life.

For the sequel, I’m bringing in The Strangely Unique, and hope to teach acceptance and understanding of the individuals that participated in “The Freak Shows.” Granted, they were for most of the time – willing participants.  Unfortunately, men saw The Strangely Unique as cash  making machines, and at times were taken advantage of.  Millie and Christine (The Two-Headed Nightingale), another character in the sequel,  were born into slavery, sold, kidnapped, and then later returned to their family and much better situation.  The Dog-Faced Boy, a character in The Strangely Unique, was making $500 dollars a week in 1895 according to some sources.  That wage is even good today by some standards!

The sequel will offer the same witty rhymes that incorporate character names, presentations or lines from the circus advertisements right in the text of the story, eye-popping illustrations, and a ton of fun! I plan on releasing The Wondrous Wandering Acrobats Show Returns: The Strangely Unique as a POD through Ingram Spark tentatively in April of 2019, but I’m hopeful it may be earlier!

 

The Best Ways to Get Your Self-Published Book in City Library

So, you’ve written a cool book. You want to get it out in the hands of your demographic. If you’re like me, you’re thinking about how you can get it in your local library, right? I’m not totally sure, but small-towners may have a much easier time getting their self-published book in the local library than us city folk. Libraries get bombarded with submission requests. Although I don’t claim to have all the answers, this is what I was told from our local county library system:

Reviews from industry sources will improve the ability of selectors to fully evaluate your book. Review sources for independently published materials include:

Small Press Reviews:

Apparently not accepting submissions at this time. Fine.

Kirkus Indie Book Reviews :

Pay to get reviewed? Kirkus Indie Book Reviews is wanting 350 dollars for a review. Not sure I can afford that!

Independent Publisher:

There submission guidelines are pretty straight forward.  It does sound like they probably choose winners of the IPPY Awards (their awards), or from indie submissions. Cool.

How We Choose Books for Review

IndependentPublisher.com publishes original reviews of noteworthy new titles, chosen by our editorial staff from review submissions and entries into our six awards contests. We also feature books in articles and round-ups throughout the year. We review these books to bring increased recognition to the thousands of great — and often overlooked — independently published titles released each year. This is also why we launched our first book awards contest, the Independent Publisher Book Awards, in 1996.

Winning a book award and getting a good review published are two of the best marketing tools available to the independent publisher today. To be considered for a review, send your book to the address below. If your title is chosen, a member of the editorial staff will contact you with a link to the completed review.

IP, 1129 Woodmere Ave, Suite B, Traverse City MI 49686

Independently published books entered into our awards contests will also be considered for review. See here for more details about each awards program.

Midwest Review:

There guidelines are also pretty straight forward. If you are submitting ebooks, pre-publication manuscripts, galleys, uncorrected proofs, ARCs, or pdf files, expect to pay 50 bucks.  From what I can tell, it’s free to send them a hard copy of your book.

To submit a print book for review, we require the following:

  1. Two copies of the published book.
  2. A cover letter.
  3. A publicity or press release. This (or the cover letter) must include either a physical address or an email address to send the review to.

Send to:

James A. Cox
Editor-in-Chief
Midwest Book Review
278 Orchard Drive
Oregon, WI 53575

Booklife:

Booklife has a couple of options I believe. You first need to create an account. From there, you can send ebooks or hard copies.  They have a completely free option for a possible review, and if I’m not mistaken, a paid option for a guaranteed review.

In Closing

I was only told about these particular industry review sources.  I can’t say if a review anywhere else would help or not. Don’t let it discourage you from trying!

Remember, even after getting your book reviewed from one of the above industry reviewers won’t guarantee you a spot in the library system. It only gives you an “improved chance.”  Make sure your book is available to buy at a book store or somewhere because if you do get a spot, they’ll need to be able to pick up a copy.

In the case of children’s books; make sure the copy of your book is going to hold up to the abuse of thousands of tiny hands. Most of the children’s books I check-out are hardbound for this very reason!  “Only materials that are sturdily bound, preferably sewn or glued (without spiral or comb bindings) will be considered. Books with pages designed to be filled in or torn out by the reader will not be purchased.”

Good luck and keep writing!

-Anders

da328f_c92aa325ff7540d78a786eb0ca77640e-mv2

Local Author receives national recognition from the 11th Annual National Indie Excellence® Awards!

Los Angeles: — The 11th Annual National Indie Excellence® Awards recognized (Title of Book by Author’s Name) in the category of (Category) as a (winner/finalist) in this year’s competition.

This prestigious National award is open to all English language books in print from small, medium, university, self and independent publishers.

The National Indie Excellence® Awards exists to help establish independent publishing as a strong and proud facet of the publishing industry. Recognizing authors that put their heart and soul into their work, the NIEA is a champion of self-publishers and the small, independent presses that go the extra mile to produce books of excellence in every aspect. Established in 2007, the NIEA competition is judged by experts from all aspects of the book industry, including publishers, writers, editors, book cover designers and professional copywriters.

Winners and finalists are determined based on ‘overall excellence of presentation- a synergy of form and content.  Priscilla and the Sandman is a Children’s Picture Book Age 4-8. Priscilla, a child is doing everything to stay up. That is until mom tells her about the Sandman. The Sandman visits her and takes her on a journey of delicious rhyming and eye candy. It’s visually stunning and a fun read for children.

 “We are proud to announce the winners & finalists whose books truly embody the excellence that this award was created to celebrate, and we salute you all for your fine work.” –Ellen Reid, Founder NIEA

For more information please visit: www.indieexcellence.com